bishopmyles:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

thequeenandthephoenix:

blackgirlsprettythings:

prominent-afro-history:

"Joshua Beckford learned to read fluently by the time he was two and a half and taught himself to touch-type on a computer before he could write using a pencil.
He can speak Japanese, practices medical surgery on a computer simulator and has completed more than 1,000 maths problems.”

Can we please reblog our children!!!

HOW THOUGH??? HOW IS THIS AMAZINGNESS POSSIBLE. 

resources

That’s wilddddddddddddddd, gon head boi!

(via politicalpolitics)

Timestamp: 1413868207

bishopmyles:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

thequeenandthephoenix:

blackgirlsprettythings:

prominent-afro-history:

"Joshua Beckford learned to read fluently by the time he was two and a half and taught himself to touch-type on a computer before he could write using a pencil.
He can speak Japanese, practices medical surgery on a computer simulator and has completed more than 1,000 maths problems.”

Can we please reblog our children!!!

HOW THOUGH??? HOW IS THIS AMAZINGNESS POSSIBLE. 

resources

That’s wilddddddddddddddd, gon head boi!

(via politicalpolitics)

goldenlady25:

New Rich Life Collection from Pop Up Plus NY. All looks are under $50.00 making it affordable for all. Check it out!

Check out my blog for more looks!

(via shurikenpromises)

Timestamp: 1413785982

goldenlady25:

New Rich Life Collection from Pop Up Plus NY. All looks are under $50.00 making it affordable for all. Check it out!

Check out my blog for more looks!

(via shurikenpromises)

sitting, waiting, wishing

One month until I go home (for a three day trip).

Six weeks until thanksgiving break. (for five days off!)

Two months until winter break. (And three whole weeks off!)

Waiting, life is a waiting game. It’s not that I’m unhappy, it’s just that a piece of my heart is missing when I’m without them. I actually really love it here and I love school and I love “work”. I just wish I could teleport or that everyone was here. I guess I’m just bored again. I vacillate between way too busy and bored. There is no in-between. Oh well, in life we must have things to look forward to. I’m looking forward to seeing everyone again. I start missing everyone every now and then.

I just gotta make it through this month and the second month will move quickly with the thanksgiving break in the middle of it. After this month, december will come with a quickness and before I know it, my birthday will be upon me. When did I stop knowing how to chill?

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

(via youngblackandvegan)

Timestamp: 1413778565

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

(via youngblackandvegan)

snailfart:

The cauldron spilled over.

Purple ombre / jelly sandwich, bottom —› top:

  • Zoya Miley
  • L’Oreal Lilac Coolers
  • L’Oreal Berry Nice
  • Max Factor Fantasy Fire
  • Kleancolor Chunky Holo Black

Orange swirl dry marble:

  • Sinful Colors Cloud 9
  • Sinful Colors Opal Glitter
  • NYC Purple Pizzazz Frost

(via thesassyblacknerd)

Timestamp: 1413777862

snailfart:

The cauldron spilled over.

Purple ombre / jelly sandwich, bottom —› top:

  • Zoya Miley
  • L’Oreal Lilac Coolers
  • L’Oreal Berry Nice
  • Max Factor Fantasy Fire
  • Kleancolor Chunky Holo Black

Orange swirl dry marble:

  • Sinful Colors Cloud 9
  • Sinful Colors Opal Glitter
  • NYC Purple Pizzazz Frost

(via thesassyblacknerd)

6,977 plays
  • Trackname:

    Blessa
  • Artist:

    Toro Y Moi

lensblr-network:

See you soon baby.

"I’m so afraid of losing something I love that I refuse to love anything."

Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (via angryasianfeminist)